Something about boat problems and making lemonade

"A little higher, guys, and a little to the left... I can't hold her all day!"

“A little higher, guys, and a little to the left… I can’t hold her all day!”

The bad news: We had to get hauled out this week.

The good news: We’re back in the water and finally on our way to Eleuthera tomorrow!

So here’s what happened. After slowly traversing the Abacos from north to south, we had finally made our way down to Little Harbor, our gateway to cross to Eleuthera. With the boat safely anchored, Aaron donned his snorkel gear and dove down to clear what we thought was a clogged water inlet for our watermaker (turns out it was just an air lock in a pump which, once found, was fixed in seconds). But while he was down there, he noticed that our sacrificial anodes, or zincs, were in bad shape. The one on our propeller had fallen off (the bottom cleaner we hired in Florida installed it for us and apparently didn’t bolt it on correctly) and the one on our saildrive was just about shot.

We had another propeller anode on board and Aaron was able to do a quick replacement. The saildrive anode, however, was another story. We didn’t have a replacement on board – a definite oversight. And, to boot, replacing it meant disassembling the propeller and reassembling it. Newer saildrives allow zinc replacement without removing the prop… what a concept! Some props simply come off in one piece, but of course, we have a fancy, feathering propeller that folds up when we’re sailing to reduce drag. Great, except that to remove it, it has to be taken apart in many pieces (see photo). Not something easily done under water with scuba gear – at least, not the first time, which it would be for us.

The saildrive. Imagine disassembling this and then reassembling it while in full scuba gear under the boat. Nope.

The saildrive. Imagine disassembling this and then reassembling it while in full scuba gear under the boat. Nope.

For those who are unfamiliar, sacrificial anodes are pieces of zinc, a less noble metal, that stray electrical currents slowly eat away at, rather than the propeller, saildrive, or other underwater metal parts of the boat. They can originate in a number of ways – either from neighboring boats in a marina, or from an electrical issue on your boat. Aaron figures it was a combination of other boats in marinas back in the States, as well as an electrical issue of our own that he found and fixed during our first month on the boat this summer.

The anodes are very, very important and replacing them is just a matter of routine maintenance, not an issue of the boat malfunctioning. He had been keeping an eye on the propeller anode and had it replaced shortly before leaving the States.  However, this being our first boat with a saildrive, we didn’t realize there was another anode for it.  It should have been changed back in the States as well.

So there we were, perfectly positioned to head to Eleuthera the next day, and we had to make a decision. We could cross – the anodes needed attention, but we would be okay for another few weeks or more. But, Eleuthera is even more remote than the Abacos. We started frantically researching how we might get the anodes shipped there, and though there seemed to be a few possibilities, they were questionable at best, and definitely wouldn’t be speedy.

Clarity's Saildrive

Clarity’s Saildrive

The bigger problem, though, was that there aren’t any yacht yards in the Eleuthera island chain that could haul out the boat. So, either we swallowed our pride, turned the boat around and stayed in the Abacos to get the boat hauled, or we continued on and either got the parts shipped somewhere in Eleuthera and did all the work underwater in scuba gear (don’t drop anything!), or hoped the old anode held up long enough to get to Georgetown in the Exumas and got hauled out there. Honestly, we were extremely lucky that Aaron noticed the problem the day before we left, when we were still in a place that afforded us some options.  It’s amazing how a $20 part can bring everything to a halt.

After a day of letting the bad news sink in, we bit the bullet and ordered the anodes to be delivered to Marsh Harbor, as we had done with the engine shift/throttle mechanism a month or so ago. We called the Marsh Harbor Boat Yard and got on their schedule for a haul out the soonest they had an opening, a week later. And we tried to make the most of the time in between. It’s all just time and money, right? A lot of both.

hauledUltimately, it all turned out fine. Sure, there were hiccups. Our package was delayed clearing customs, which pushed us back a day. And the delay meant that we missed our window for a short-haul of just a few hours to replace the anodes, and instead had to be fully hauled out and blocked for a night. But, we also rented a car in Marsh Harbor to maximize our time. We did a big provisioning run, filled our propane tanks, got diesel for the boat, stopped at the bank, made a few trips to the hardware store, and even managed to get a few birthday presents for Claire. Her birthday is at the end of March, and toy stores and Amazon shipments just don’t exist here, especially not where we’re headed. Marsh Harbor was our best bet, and luckily, I found just what I was looking for – a kickboard.

Those pesky anodes

Those pesky anodes

Aaron also put in two grueling days of hard manual labor, taking advantage of the boat being out of the water to take care of as many things as possible in addition to the anodes, like cleaning the bottom of the boat, resealing and cleaning out some throughhull fittings, fixing our underwater speed sensor, reinstalling the rubber fairing around the saildrive (lots of sanding and gluing), and overseeing some workers fixing our broken window and changing the oil in the saildrive (it has to be drained out and pumped in from the bottom).

The boat was hauled on Wednesday midday and was back in the water 24 hours later. By mid-afternoon Thursday, we dropped anchor again in Little Harbor, where it all started. And tomorrow, we will cross the Atlantic 65 miles to Eleuthera – with two new anodes in place, and two spares of each on board.

While Aaron was taking a break from working on the boat, he walked across the yacht yard to several men working on a beautiful catamaran. Feeling somewhat gloomy, he thought, “If we could only afford something like that, we wouldn’t be fixing stuff all the time.” The boat is two years old and valued at roughly $550,000. What could they possibly be fixing on such a new, expensive boat?

Both rudder shafts were apparently cast with inferior steel and had swelled in place. The result: The owners were barely able to steer the boat. It was hauled out and had been there for quite some time while new parts were made, others were ordered from France, and many, many hours of hired labor were put in to tear apart and rebuild the steering system. Someone’s cruising plans had not just been delayed, but completely canceled.

We will always have problems to fix, parts to replace, and maintenance chores to do, as this boat is many times more complex than our previous one. Weather conditions will delay plans, freak medical conditions will pop up. The lesson here is to not let these things kill your spirit. I think we’re getting better and better at that.

The Case of the Three-Thousand-Dollar Black Bean

Claire in her "hospital costume," as she called it, right before they put her under.

Claire in her “hospital costume,” as she called it, right before they put her under.

To say that the last week was a rough one would be putting it mildly.

After striking out Monday at the local clinics and waiting out the national holiday on Tuesday, Aaron and I caught the ferry Wednesday morning with Claire, rented a car (from Big Papa, because in the out-islands, everything is family run) and drove to the clinic in Marsh Harbor.

We were so hopeful, but after multiple attempts to get the bean out, we had to come to terms with the realization that true medical help was not only necessary, but a plane ride away.

Claire, happy as can be in her pillow fort, in our hotel room in Marsh Harbor.

Claire, happy as can be in her pillow fort, in our hotel room in Marsh Harbor.

Sitting in our hotel room that night in Marsh Harbor, waiting for the flight Claire and I would have to catch the following morning to go to the hospital in Nassau, Aaron and I were in bad shape. Totally defeated. We just couldn’t catch a break, it seemed.

“Do you want to quit?” “…Do you?”

Honestly, we didn’t know what the other would say.

You see, the bean was the cherry on top of two weeks that have been equal amounts stressful and wonderful. Yes, there have been amazing anchorages, gorgeous beaches, swimming and snorkeling, and great friends.  The other half of the story is that, shortly after we crossed to the Bahamas, our batteries stopped holding their charge and would die overnight. Our watermaker all of a sudden started functioning at 50% the output we had when we brought it online in Florida. One of the windows of our hard dodger shattered, showering our entire cockpit and parts of our salon with glass.

Our Wi-Fi for tethering to our phones, which we need for work, wouldn’t load properly, even after hours of troubleshooting. Bugs started cropping up in our galley at night. And a prolonged cold front came through that not only brought temps too chilly for swimming, but also winds and a sea state that made getting further south impossible until it lifted.

And then, Claire stuck a bean up her nose – “tree trunk,” she named it shortly after it took up residence in her left nostril. So you see, we were already pretty run down.

Planes, trains and automobiles - all because of a little black bean

Planes, trains and automobiles – all because of a little black bean

In a really big way, we were lucky. Though we had to get the bean out as soon as possible, Claire’s “ailment” was not painful. But it was extremely traumatic for her, not really knowing what was going on, with Aaron and me trying to hold her down and doctors she didn’t know shoving tools she didn’t understand down her nose.

The biggest contributor to the decision to fly to Nassau was that she simply wouldn’t lay still. She just couldn’t calm down, even with a shot of Valium to try to ease the anxiety. With each attempt at the clinic in Marsh Harbor, her fight got stronger, and it became less and less safe to try to get the bean out. So, alas, a flight to Nassau, where she could be safely put under, was in order. If it’s any indication of the state she was in when we got to the hospital, even the sight of a nurse walking in with a pen would send her cowering behind me, poor thing.

The staff at Doctor’s Hospital in Nassau was fine. We went straight there from the airport and were registered in the emergency room almost immediately. Shortly thereafter, the doctor on call told me he was working with the ENT and the anesthesiologist to determine a plan.

Keeping spirits up in the waiting room! Markers make everything better.

Keeping spirits up in the waiting room! Markers make everything better.

What I didn’t know, though, and I wish the doctor in Marsh Harbor had told me, is that to put Claire under safely, she needed to have fasted for at least six hours. I had given her snacks on the 1 p.m. flight, so we had to sit and wait until 7 p.m. for them to treat her, Claire getting more and more hungry and antsy as the minutes wore on.

Finally, when it was time, I think Claire was so excited to finally leave the waiting room we had been in for hours that she took it like a champ, happily putting the hospital gown on, smiling, joking with the nurses. She gave me a thumbs up while they wheeled her away in her bed – it was as far as I was allowed to go – and they sent me out to the waiting room. It was an absolutely horrible feeling.

The infamous black bean

The infamous black bean

But 20 minutes later, it was done. The bean had been successfully removed, she was waking up and I was allowed back up to see her. “They found tree trunk,” Claire said in a sleepy stupor, and as I called Aaron with the news, relief washed over us. We flew back the next morning, took a cab back to the ferry dock, made the 20-minute trip across the Sea of Abaco, and were back on Clarity by 11 a.m.

So let’s talk money. The ferry for Aaron and Claire to get to the mainland on Monday ($21 round trip per person) and the cab to and from the Cooper’s Town Clinic. The ferry back to mainland for the three of us on Wednesday morning, the rental car to drive to Marsh Harbor ($75), the hotel stay ($150), as we’d missed the window to get back for the last ferry. Then on Thursday, the flight for two (round trip – $300 for the 30-minute flight, thanks to last-minute booking), the cab to the hospital, the cab from the hospital to the hotel, the cost of the hotel stay in Nassau ($260, the cheapest we could find), the cab from the hotel to the airport on Friday, the flight back, the cab for Claire and I back down to the ferry stop ($85), and the return ferry trip. And that’s just travel.

The first two clinics – Green Turtle and Cooper’s Town – didn’t charge us anything, and for all of the effort of the doctor in Marsh Harbor and his staff, and the medicine they used, the total was only $115. At the hospital, however, there was the emergency room charge ($500), for simply registering and sitting in the waiting room for more than four hours. Then the substantial charges really began, because to have her put under, she actually had to be admitted. And with that comes the cost for the ENT, the cost for the anesthesiologist, the cost for the nurses, the cost for the bed. We had to put down an additional deposit of $2,500 for them to even treat her.

We don’t have the final bills yet, but the charges for the hospital visit alone will be more than $2k (they could be more or less than the required deposit – we have no way of knowing until we get the bill).

Of course, you do what you have to do. We never hesitated, each step of the way, in getting Claire the care she needed. In doing as much as we could together, then Claire and I flying ourselves to Nassau to save the flight fee for the third person. In trying as best as we both could to swallow our frustrations and exhaustion and keep Claire in good spirits.

Kids are so resilient; it always amazes me. The same day she and I made it back to the boat, she was out playing at the beach with her friends, supremely happy. No pain, no residual symptoms, nothing.

I slept 12 hours that night. I still feel tired.

We’re trying our best to not let these things kill our spirit. Aaron was able to isolate and fix the issue with the batteries and we have a plan for troubleshooting the watermaker. With fastidious cleaning and a military approach to crumbs and food waste, the bug issue seems to be dissipating. We’ve found a place in Marsh Harbor that can replace our shattered cockpit window, we have a workaround for the Wi-Fi, and the seas should finally lay down enough in the next day or two for us to head south.

Above everything, though, Claire is healthy and back to her happy self, running face-first into the waves and setting up coconut stands on the beach with her friends.

I’m sure six months or a year from now, I’ll look back on the story of the black bean and laugh. Right now, it’s still just a bit too soon.

Crash Course in Island Healthcare

whiningfeeHave you ever wondered what you’d do if you stuck a bean up your nose in a remote location?

No?

Us either. Turns out, we should have.

We’ve been in the Abacos for almost two weeks now, and we’ve already had some amazing pinch-me moments.

But one thing to remember – we are reminded every day – is that we are not on vacation. This is our life. And with that comes the expected tasks (laundry, cooking, cleaning, school, work, boat projects), and the unanticipated ones.

On Sunday morning, as I was preparing some meals for the week, Claire asked to see a few of the dried black beans I had out. And then she proceeded to stick one up her nose.

“I wanted to see what it would feel like.” I don’t know what else to say about the act itself. For the longest time, we thought she was joking. But that’s a pretty specific experience she put together. Turns out the joke was on us.

Now, in the States, I’d just throw her in the car and take her to the nearest walk-in clinic so they could suck it out and we could be on about our day. (We tried and tried and tried all of the obvious ways here on the boat to get it out.) But in the out-islands of the Bahamas, when you live on a sailboat, things work a little differently.

We are fortunate that the island we’re currently at (Green Turtle Cay) is developed enough that there’s a clinic – however, it’s only open Monday through Friday and there’s no after-hours emergency line to call. So, Monday morning, we piled into a golf cart rented by another cruising family we’ve come to know here and headed to town.

“Oh, no. We can’t fix that here. It’s way up there? No, we don’t have a tool for that here. You’ll have to go to the mainland for that.” (Keep in mind that I had gritted my teeth and paid for the expensive call to the clinic when it first opened that morning to explain the problem and make sure they’d be able to see us.)

Well, the ‘mainland’ is the northern part of Great Abaco Island, across the Sea of Abaco from where we are, and we had two options: Cooper’s Town and Marsh Harbor. The former is a smaller town but still with a government clinic allegedly more well-equipped than the one at Green Turtle Cay. Marsh Harbor is the third-largest city in the Bahamas, with robust medical facilities, but farther away (i.e. more expensive for travel). And with a cold front that has settled in the Abacos like a cold that won’t quit, the seas are kicked up and we don’t want to move the boat out of our protected anchorage.

So, luckily again, there’s a ferry from Green Turtle across to Treasure Cay on the big island. From there, we’d have to cab it to either location – with the ride to Marsh Harbor being twice as expensive.

Early Monday afternoon, Aaron spoke with the staff at the Cooper’s Town clinic, who were very friendly and helpful on the phone. They gave us the names of specific doctors in Marsh Harbor who could help, but right as we were about to make the decision to head straight there, realizing that we’d never make it back to Treasure Cay in time for the last ferry of the day and would have to also pay for a hotel room there, they said, “Bring her here to Cooper’s Town. We think we can get it out.”

Off Aaron and Claire went on the 3 o’clock ferry (I stayed back to save the ferry fee and also make some progress on a work deadline). By 3:30, they were in a cab and by 3:45, the doctors were taking a look at her. “Nope, we can’t get that out. Too far up there.” It didn’t help that Claire was flinching and crying anytime anyone tried to get a good look up her nose.

Back in the cab, back on the ferry, back to the dinghy, back to the boat, $115 poorer and still with that damn bean firmly planted up Claire’s left nostril.

The thing is, if it had been anything else – a viral infection, a jellyfish sting, a weird bug bite – they likely could have treated it here in Green Turtle, and definitely in Cooper’s Town. But this is now bordering on internal medicine.

Oh, and another kicker – today is a national holiday, so everything is closed.

So tomorrow, we have an appointment with a specialist in Marsh Harbor at 2 p.m. We’ll have to hop in the dinghy to shore, get the ferry again, rent a car and drive to Marsh Harbor. If the specialist can’t get it out, either because Claire won’t settle enough for him to make a good attempt or because it’s lodged in too far, we’ll have to take her to the emergency room, where they’ll likely have to put her under to get it out.

Hopefully, we’ll make it back to Treasure Cay in time for that last ferry at 5 p.m., though likely not. So, add the price of a hotel room to the tab.

One thing I will say, though, is that so far, the costs of this debacle have all been travel-related. The medical professionals haven’t been able to help us so far, but there also wasn’t a wait at any of the clinics, and no fee just to walk in the door and be seen, unlike in the States, where the five-minute visit at each location would have been $100 or more, with or without resolution.

Yes, such an amazing and exciting life we lead as cruisers, with the swimming and the snorkeling and the sailing. And the planes, trains and automobiles required to hopscotch back and forth across the Sea of Abaco, all because our delightful, intelligent, inquisitive daughter decided on a whim to jam a bean up her nose.