Royal Island Ruins

dscn3480When we experience places truly only accessible by boat, or even only by small boat (dinghy), that’s when this whole thing peaks for me.

After a beautiful sail last weekend from the Abacos to the Eleuthera chain, we tucked into an uninhabited area called Royal Island, a little sliver of land northwest of the main Eleuthera island.

It was as remote as you could get. There were signs of an abandoned, and then restarted, and then stalled resort development; beach villas and a fairly substantial ferry dock remained, likely to provide transportation from the main island to the property.

And there was an old fishing retreat that other cruisers had told us was not to be missed. As the story goes, the development was built in the 1930s by wealthy Floridian W. P. Stuart as a remote getaway to kick back with his friends. It included a cliffside bar, a grand fireplace, numerous outbuildings, and trails down to the beach on the Atlantic side.

At some point, the parties ceased, and the estate was left to settle into its surroundings. Many of the buildings are crumbling, with vines forming a picturesque wallpaper. Lizards now have the run of the place, and flora blooms in the holes between the bricks.

The dock was also mostly deteriorated, with a few poles left jutting out of concrete and ragged rocks. It was just enough for us to (very carefully) tie up our dinghy and climb the steps to a little enclave built almost 90 years ago.

We couldn’t stay long, but we respectfully left our mark – a conch shell bearing our names placed on the bar, as others have done before us. And we left, as quietly as we’d come.

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One thought on “Royal Island Ruins

  1. Just like Swiss Family Robinson. I love stories like this and I live the dream through your blogs. Thank you!!!! BE SAVE. And throughly enjoy all your adventures. Bev Billingsley

    Like

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