Getting There

Aaron troubleshooting the fridge, with Claire keeping her worker on task.

Aaron troubleshooting the fridge, with Claire keeping her worker on task.

I’ve been struggling for awhile with how to write this next post.

Life transitions are hard – that’s not news – but how much should you share? Who wants to read something negative? But the more I’ve thought about it, the more I’ve reminded myself that positive or negative, people just want to read something honest. So here’s the truth.

This has been really, really hard – much harder than we anticipated. It’s for reasons that we know are temporary, and circumstances that we know will improve – but day to day, we just keep hoping for more wins than losses.

When we moved aboard three weeks ago (almost four now, wow!), we unknowingly moved ourselves onto a boat that needed a big refit. Issues that we knew needed attention turned into bigger projects, new systems quit on us, problems that we thought we had fixed reoccurred. I say we, but Aaron has taken the brunt of this. As much as I need and want to learn all of these systems, right now, there isn’t time for him to be both teacher and engineer/mechanic. So he focuses mainly on executing, while I focus mainly on the daily running of the household.

Just to name a few “challenges,” our new air conditioning quit on us multiple times. The refrigerator quit with a full grocery shop of food. The freezer seemed to be a lost cause. The shower didn’t work. Outlets were miswired and non-functional. We had a small water leak in the engine room, a fuel leak in the generator. The list goes on.

For those of you who have lived through remodeling your own home, it’s like that – except that every time you need to fix or work on anything, you have to rip apart your entire living space to do it. With three people living aboard, it gets really cramped really fast. Imagine eating dinner in your woodshop, or working on the engine to your car in your bedroom.

The previous owners left bins upon bins of old and replacement parts, leftover fabrics and materials, and more in the catacombs of storage under Claire's v-berth. The only way to know what we had, what we needed, and what we could toss, was to haul it all out, one bin at a time.

The previous owners left bins upon bins of old and replacement parts, leftover fabrics and materials, and more in the catacombs of storage under Claire’s v-berth. The only way to know what we had, what we needed, and what we could toss, was to haul it all out, one bin at a time.

Once we pulled out the bins, we dragged them out to the dock and went through them piece by piece before cataloging it, repackaging it and hauling what was left back in.

Once we pulled out the bins, we dragged them out to the dock and went through them piece by piece before cataloging it, repackaging it and hauling what was left back in.

And it means that any free time that we don’t intentionally assign to down time gets sucked away just with solving problems – not to mention work deadlines, making meals, doing dishes and laundry. You know, life. We have never earned our sleep more, and never slept harder.

The other part of the equation that’s been increasingly frustrating is our location. We absolutely made the right decision to stay here – we were 100% not ready to move the boat anywhere – but Riviera Beach has not been an easy adjustment, especially since we returned the rental car. There’s nothing within walking distance, and strangely enough, there really isn’t much within dinghying or biking distance either. So even when we find a window of opportunity to take a break, the options have been limited. It’s made the transition from our prior life to this one that much more extreme.

If I’m being brutally honest, there have been moments when I’ve wanted to throw in the towel and just go back to what’s easy. Just moments, though.

Our silly goose, having a tea party with her toes in our aft cabin while we make some progress on boat projects.

Our silly goose, having a tea party with her toes in our aft cabin while we make some progress on boat projects.

I don’t mean to paint this all as doom and gloom – it’s certainly not. It’s funny – at least a few people have asked, “How is Claire doing with all of this?” The best of the three of us, by far. The weather gods have been quite grumpy the last few days, and I just realized this evening that she hasn’t been off the boat, except for right on our dock, in two full days, and you’d never know it with how happy she’s been. Sure, she’s used to someone playing with her all the time, be that classmates at school or friends during playdates, so she wants constant attention, and we are working on that. But for the most part, build that kiddo a fort and put out tea for her stuffed animals and she’s content.

I’m trying to keep a positive attitude and remind myself that this is not what our life is going to look like. We will always have work that needs doing, it’s the nature of owning a boat, but it won’t be all-encompassing. For me, the impetus of this life change was the adventure, traveling, meeting new people, taking to the sea! We haven’t even tossed the lines once yet. But we will, we will. We will get there.

Slowly, the wins are starting to overcome the losses. The fridge and freezer are now working, the shower is finally working, leaks have been fixed. The air conditioning is running smoothly and we are just now getting to the point where we can put down-below projects on hold for a bit while we get the topsides ready for sailing.

Our month here is up in a week and a half, and then we’ll cast lines, fill the sails and make our way up to Fort Pierce. Somehow, I just know that once I feel the wind on my face and the waves on our bow, I’ll be recharged, ready to tackle whatever comes next.

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5 thoughts on “Getting There

  1. The honesty is welcome, even as it prompts a lot of empathy. Yours is a story, and stories with no conflict, no difficulty, no surprises (welcome or unwelcome) are not authentic. It’s fitting that you’re seeking what you’ve determined is authentic for your lives in this time. Don’t get me wrong — it sounds exhausting, and a daunting way to live even for a few weeks. And don’t sell yourself short in the engineering department, heh heh: Your description in your last post of the fixes you made were waaay beyond my ken. You’re right: You will get there, and I envy you the freshening wind that will fill the sails and cool your face. Thanks for the photos — they make me imagine the wind in MY face.

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  2. Honesty is hard, especially when you are putting it out there publicly.

    We’re also a liveaboard family and have had to delay our departure by a year, to hopefully stem many of the same frustrations. Our boat turned out to need a LOT more work than we had anticipated. There are some days that our project list gets so long I have to walk away. We have started scheduling in non-boat work times so our kids get some much needed focused attention.

    You’re right, it’s hard, but worth it.

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  3. Thanks for your honesty. Reading about your adventure, probably reminds people of their own adventures or plans for adventure. The very essence of adventure is the unknown, and of course that’s not necessarily pleasant. Our move to California has hit a rough spot. The house in Illinois, which everyone thought would sell quickly, has not sold. The air conditioner died and we had to replace it long distance. Until the house sells, we are stuck in a one bedroom apartment with most of our stuff stored in Illinois. But when most people ask, I say it’s great here! Anyway, I know you’ll be sailing soon and it will all be worth it! I know Claire will thrive, no matter what, kids are so resilient.

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